May 252015
 
Spirit Fox by Mandy Tsung

Spirit Fox by Mandy Tsung

In this age of instantly answerable questions, there is very little mystery left intact. Governed as we are by the great scientific quest which pulls things apart to get at their mechanics, we are desperate for that which returns us to cohesion.

One of the greatest challenges in approaching dreams, which is but an echo of our relationship with the Earth, is allowing mystery to work upon us. There are certain questions which, as the poet David Whyte puts it, ‘have no right to go away.’ There is a delicate alchemy which brews in our not-knowing and which is essential to our becoming worthy of the dream’s revelation.

As Dr. Clarissa Pinkola Estes tells us, there are those ancients who referred to the dreammaker as ‘The Riddle Mother’ because when you carry your question into sleep, she responds to it with a riddle. Like any good fairy tale, the task is not to find an answer, but to become the kind of person who knows which way to go.

The task is not to find an answer, but to become the kind of person who knows which way to go.Click To Tweet

If you feel dissatisfied with Dream Dictionaries, which reduce your symbols to mean something other than they are, like “If you dream of a butterfly it means new beginnings” it is because your living mystery is being objectified. Symbols are living, breathing beings who change depending on the eyes who see them. As James Hillman puts it, “Like the fox in the forest is not mine just because I see it, so the fox in the dream is not mine just because I dream it.”

I believe one of the great challenges of our time is our coming back into relationship with mystery. Rather than making an expectation of our needs being met, let us make a courtship of that which we admire. Let us make our lives alluring enough that the mystery might become curious of us! Let us stand with a respectful distance and make an invitation of ourselves, such that wildness might decide to approach us. Let us find ways to pray ourselves to the forest, even when we hear nothing back. Let us keep returning to that silence and allow ourselves to be shaped by our yearning for answers.

You might also enjoy:

About 

A writer, artist and tender of dreams, Toko-pa has been interviewed by CNN News & BBC Radio and her writing has appeared in publications around the world. Thanks to Skype, she works with dreamers internationally in her Private Dreamwork practice, based on Salt Spring Island in Canada. You can find Toko-pa on Facebook or sign up for her mailing list to receive news about upcoming events.
 

    Connect with Toko-pa
  • facebook
  • googleplus
  • pinterest
  • twitter
  • youtube

  15 Responses to “Courting the Mystery”

  1. I am so moved by the resonance I feel in your gifted writing, here.
    That you ‘know’ David Whyte and Estes, tells me we are on the same page. I look forward to your next. In anticipation ….

  2. These words are nourishment for my longing.

  3. So, so beautiful… Nothing more sublime than resting in the unknowing xox

  4. Yes! Having transported myself from a forest life to India, I am finding that this mystery pervades everything if we do as you suggest. Keep on with your special work toko-pa.

  5. Yes, yes, yes – lovely post, Toko-pa 🙂

  6. “Pray ourselves into the forest…” yesss!!!

  7. Make friends with the mystery, shyly, silently, awed by her allure, and perhaps she will become curious about your own allure. Love this!!

  8. Beautiful and insightful. Thankyou.

  9. […] dream worker Toko-pa Turner, in this blog post, titled “Courting the Mystery” (in which she, too, quotes Hillman) writes, “I […]

 Leave a Reply

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title="" rel=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

(required)

(required)

1.2K Shares
Share1.2K
Pin67
Email
Tweet